WHITEHOUSE FAMILY HISTORY CENTRE

Newsletter, 7th January 2022

Dear Readers,

 

Website securitised

I am pleased to have had this website securitised as of 24th November 2021. Notice the padlock and the https address.

 

Change of practice

I shall answer enquiries from the public about marriages in the Guild of One-Name Studies' Global Marriage Index.

 

Additions to the GRO marriages file

9 additional spouses identified: UN 3807 (Henry John WHITEHOUSE m. Jane Coulthard SYKES, 1878 Q2); UN 5656 (John George WHITEHOUSE m. Alice Emma TUTT, 1893 Q2); (UN 6187, Isaac WHITEHOUSE m. Ellen CLARKE, 1896 Q4); UN 8636 (Robert V WHITEHOUSE m. Emma J BLACKHAM, 1910 Q3); UN 8664 (Frank H WHITEHOUSE m. Nellie PARRISH, 1910 Q4); UN 8681 (William Frederick BATT m. Sarah A WHITEHOUSE, 1910 Q4); UN 8690 Richard W PREES m. Amy M WHITEHOUSE, 1911 Q1); UN 8699 (Frederick HARVEY m. Florence B WHITEHOUSE, 1911 Q1);

UN 8707 David SILSBY m. Lily Violet WHITEHOUSE 1911 Q1). Further additions welcome.

 

Clandestine marriages

The Fleet marriages file (new to the WFHC) shows 30 Whitehouses in the registers of the Fleet Prison Chapel and other Chapels in London where clandestine marriages took place. They were conducted by an ordained priest, without banns or licence, an advantage to those who wished to hide their marriage from public view. The registers, some of which were in notebook form, were kept by the officiating priest, but many are copies. Where the details given differ, it is difficult to know which register to believe. This WFHC transcript shows the major variations. Such clandestine marriages led to the 1753 Hardwicke Act banning them from 25th March 1754 and prescribing the information that had to be given in parish registers. Although the marriages took place in London, this was not necessarily the residence of the parties. A feature of these marriages is that many give residence information of the parties, their marital condition and the man's occupation. Chapman code abbreviations for counties have been used in this transcript and forenames have been normalised.

 

The 1911 census file revision progress

Brian Strehlke and I have been working steadily away, proceeding alphabetically by county and have reached Sussex, except that Staffordshire, which has by far the largest number of Whitehouse households, is still in progress. While I am working on Staffordshire, Brian is tackling Warwickshire. An up to date file has been put on the website today.

 

Offers of help

I can always use an offer of help to improve the material on the website.

 

1921 census

The 1921 Census, the largest census release in England and Wales was held on 19th June 1921 and shows 38 million individuals in 18 million images. It was released yesterday (6th January 2022). As with the 1911 census, The National Archives (TNA) has contracted with Fiundmypast (FMP) to digitise it, giving them a period of exclusivity (3 years ?). The bad news about that is that it is not available free to subscribers to FMP. There is a charge of 2.50 per transcript and 3.50 per image viewed, with a 10% discount for those with a "Pro" subscription. The good news, not widely promulgated, is that it can be accessed free at TNA in Kew, London.

Given the Covid infection situation, it will be some while before I venture there.

 

Sadly, all the 1931 census records were destroyed in a fire at the Hayes storage depot. There was no 1941 census, although the 1939 Register is a partial substitute. The next census to become available will be that of 1951. There is a podcast about the 1921 census at

https://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/counting-down-to-the-1921-census/.

Marriage Mining and the Loach Tables

The articles that I wrote in March 2021 did not make it to the June or September issues of "The Midland Ancestor" (TMA) or "Journal of One-name Studies". Evidently, a lot of other people have been busy writing during "lockdown". The TMA version, slightly revised in June, is on this website and contains links to the Loach Tables. It has been published at pages 699 to 705 of TMA, December 2021.

 

Last words

One thing's for sure: genealogists are not bonkers. They might seem so but eventually they come to their census.

 

Happy Family Trees and best wishes for 2022,

Keith

 

PS: From now until 1st April 2022 I shall answer enquiries from and offer registration to anyone with a Whitehouse connection who bothers to read this newsletter and mentions this PS. This is on the basis that he or she is unlikely to be a timewaster. Just contact me at my address on the Guild website under the surname Goodwork.